PBS Nature program on moose

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johnhens
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PBS Nature program on moose

Post by johnhens » Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:56 am

Nature had a program on moose and their decrease in populations. Part was filmed in Grand Portage. The decline points to Global Warming and the parasitic brainworm.
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/moose-li ... ode/13815/

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Re: PBS Nature program on moose

Post by jrwiesz » Fri Feb 12, 2016 11:01 am

I watched it last night; enjoyable.
"And standing on the the crest of the Greenstone Ridge, I suddenly had this desire to retreat north to where I just come, to stay in the backcountry, to spend another day in a place where the only deadline I had was to pitch the tent before dark."
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Re: PBS Nature program on moose

Post by fonixmunkee » Sun Feb 14, 2016 2:58 am

Fantastic episode. Beautiful images and cinematography. This film does a great job or portraying the dire circumstances about the moose population decline. Although, I must say, it's an unfortunate title, even if it's accurate.

I can't believe how close the cameraman can get to the moose. It's also an impressive effort following these animals, and really great tracking. I'd love to know how they accomplished that.
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Re: PBS Nature program on moose

Post by johnhens » Sun Feb 14, 2016 7:59 am

fonixmunkee wrote:
I can't believe how close the cameraman can get to the moose. It's also an impressive effort following these animals, and really great tracking. I'd love to know how they accomplished that.
Tricia and I were talking about the number of times we have been charged in Spring when the cows had their new calves and how he/they avoided that.

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Re: PBS Nature program on moose

Post by MikeTokarz » Wed Feb 24, 2016 6:48 am

That was a great watch. Fantastic cinematography indeed. It was really cool how after staying with the moose for a while they began to be more comfortable with him.


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Re: PBS Nature program on moose

Post by odd man out » Wed Feb 24, 2016 7:11 am

I will have to watch that. I went backpacking last summer with a friend who is a retired DNR biologist who has done much research on moose, including IR. He taught me a lot about moose. He was also involved in the reintroduction of moose to the UP but I've never seen one there.


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Re: PBS Nature program on moose

Post by johnhens » Wed Feb 24, 2016 8:19 am

odd man out wrote:I will have to watch that. I went backpacking last summer with a friend who is a retired DNR biologist who has done much research on moose, including IR. He taught me a lot about moose. He was also involved in the reintroduction of moose to the UP but I've never seen one there.
What did you learn about moose?


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Re: PBS Nature program on moose

Post by odd man out » Wed Feb 24, 2016 10:27 am

johnhens wrote:
odd man out wrote:I will have to watch that. I went backpacking last summer with a friend who is a retired DNR biologist who has done much research on moose, including IR. He taught me a lot about moose. He was also involved in the reintroduction of moose to the UP but I've never seen one there.
What did you learn about moose?
There is this one tree (not sure now which one it is - maybe Mountain Ash) that is called the moose killer. The moose really love to eat it and will go to great lengths to get it. Unfortunately, the tree tends to grow on the edge of rocky outcroppings, including the edge of cliffs. As a DNA biologist, he would track down radio collared moose and on several occasion they would find moose who died from falling off a cliff trying to browse off this three that was just out of reach. We passes several nice trees growing right on the edge of the cliffs at pictured rocks and my friend would comment that a moose would have no hesitation to reach for those outer branches even if it meant risking a 200 foot drop into lake Superior. However, I don't think there are too many moose in PRNL.

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