What now for the Researchers on IR?

Questions regarding the Flora and Fauna on the island.

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johnhens
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What now for the Researchers on IR?

Post by johnhens » Thu Apr 21, 2016 3:14 pm

Good article on what the researchers will be doing on IR.
https://www.minnpost.com/earth-journal/ ... ost-wolves


treeplanter
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Re: What now for the Researchers on IR?

Post by treeplanter » Thu Apr 21, 2016 3:19 pm

What I find most interesting about this article is that they've been finding dead deer washed up on the shore of the island for years. Deer on the island would change everything.


Midwest Ed
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Re: What now for the Researchers on IR?

Post by Midwest Ed » Thu Apr 21, 2016 6:40 pm

Ron Meador/Rolf Peterson wrote:After a century of “hammering” by moose, which arrived on the island in the early 1900s, certain stands of fir are once again approaching heights that put them beyond destruction by browsing moose.
“But they need another five to 10 years of relief from moose to get there,” he said.
I've seen fencing used in Yellowstone to protect stands of small trees until they grow outside the reach of browsing.

I'm going to play the cynic for a moment and speculate that "upper management" would just as soon see the Island "go to hell" from an ecosystem perspective. They think it will create a highly focused example of accelerated anthropomorphic climate change.
8 trips, 1975 x 2, 1976 x 2, 1978, 1985, 2000, 2013


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johnhens
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Re: What now for the Researchers on IR?

Post by johnhens » Fri Apr 22, 2016 8:51 pm

Midwest Ed wrote:
Ron Meador/Rolf Peterson wrote:After a century of “hammering” by moose, which arrived on the island in the early 1900s, certain stands of fir are once again approaching heights that put them beyond destruction by browsing moose.
“But they need another five to 10 years of relief from moose to get there,” he said.

I'm going to play the cynic for a moment and speculate that "upper management" would just as soon see the Island "go to hell" from an ecosystem perspective. They think it will create a highly focused example of accelerated anthropomorphic climate change.
Interesting thought.

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