Food storage in campgrounds

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Paddington
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Food storage in campgrounds

Post by Paddington » Thu Aug 10, 2017 1:51 pm

Hello,

How do people usually store their food supplies at night or if they leave a campsite for a day-hike? I saw a thread from 2012 asking whether bear hangs were necessary. I'm less concerned about bears than critters (squirrels, chippies, and the like) that can easily chew a hole through a pack or food bag. It sounds like you can hang your food on nails or similar if you get a shelter, but I don't expect that a shelter will always be available.

Thanks!


thesneakymonkey
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Re: Food storage in campgrounds

Post by thesneakymonkey » Thu Aug 10, 2017 1:53 pm

When we were at a tent site we did a typical bear hang because the squirrels and foxes were always hanging around camp. In the shelter we could hang inside with ease. Had no issues doing it this way.

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Ingo
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Re: Food storage in campgrounds

Post by Ingo » Thu Aug 10, 2017 2:02 pm

I leave my food bag in the tent. Use a dry bag and pretty much everything inside is in ziplocks, if not original foil pkgs (e.g. Mt House). Hanging it won't stop the squirrels. Only time I had an issue was when a squirrel chewed a hole through the tent door netting, through the canvas Duluth Pack, and into the trail mix--we were in camp at the time. Since I've been conscientious about using a dry bag and keeping it away from the door I haven't had any problems.


Midwest Ed
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Re: Food storage in campgrounds

Post by Midwest Ed » Thu Aug 10, 2017 3:16 pm

I second Ingo's suggestion of simply keeping squirrel food away from surfaces that can be chewed through. The concept of a double wall air gap should work. Worst thing to do is to put a bag of peanuts in an outside pocket of a pack. Keep the food on the inside of the pack (not against the walls), then keep the pack inside the tent (completely zipped up of course) and once again don't let the side of the pack touch the walls of the tent.

Precautions also go for certain items of clothing as well. Campground fox will sneak up and abscond with socks or boots, attracted by the salty residue. I had a fox pull my entire dinner plastic cooking pouch off the picnic table while it was sitting in front of me. I only looked away for 2 seconds.
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Base654
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Re: Food storage in campgrounds

Post by Base654 » Thu Aug 10, 2017 7:56 pm

I have never had a problem with leaving food in tents or shelters. I too keep my food in dry bags and/or ziplocks. Like Midwest Ed, I have had a few problems while cooking/eating.


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Paddington
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Re: Food storage in campgrounds

Post by Paddington » Sat Aug 12, 2017 6:35 pm

Thank you all for the helpful and quick responses! Good to know that I should be wary (perhaps especially so) when the food is right in front of my face!

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